THE MBR BEGINNING READING PROGRAM
OVERVIEW OF UNIT I

| MBR INTRODUCTION AND TABLE OF CONTENTS |

The main objectives of the thirty-five lessons of Unit I are for the students to

The students are taught phonemic awareness and the names of the letters in order to lay the foundation for learning phonics. The students are also taught about thirty sight words as well as how to read them in simple sentences and stories so they will have a sense of what reading is all about and develop the sense that yes - they can read.

As mentioned in the introduction the key feature of the MBR Beginning Reading Program is the use of signing as used by the deaf. However, it's also important to note that the students do a number of other hands-on activities that not only help them with the mechanics of reading but also with reading comprehension. In this Unit the students handle objects to act out the sentences they're reading as well as play word games and do worksheets that involve matching pictures with sentences and drawing their own pictures for sentences they read.

It's also important to note that at every stage of the MBR program the students go from the familiar to the new. In Unit I, in particular, the students go

FORMAT OF THE LESSONS IN UNIT I

Most of the lessons in Unit I have the following format:

It's important to note that teachers do not need a background of sign language to teach the MBR lessons. There are only about thirty signs to learn - all of which are illustrated in the lesson plans. And most of which are very simple. Two good sources of additional information on signing are the Deaf World Web and The Comprehensive Signed English Dictionarywritten by Bornstein, Saulnier and Hamilton (1983) that is published by Gallaudet University Press.

And last but not least it's a good idea to leave word rings around the room for when the students have free time as well as give the students word rings to take home. It's really surprising to see how much they enjoy playing teacher - even at home with their pets.

MATERIALS FOR UNIT I

REFERENCES FOR UNIT I

Adams, M. (1990). Beginning To Read: Thinking and Learning About Print. Center for the Study of Reading: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Adams, M. (1998). Phonemic Awareness in Young Children. Baltimore, Maryland: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Company.

Commission on Reading (1985). Becoming a Nation of Readers. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education.

Daniels, M. (1996). Seeing Language: The Effect Over Time Of Sign Language on Vocabulary Development in Early Childhood Education. Child Study Journal, 26, 193-208.

Felzer, L. (1998). A Multisensory Reading Program That Really Works. Teaching and Change, 5, 169-183.

Fry, E. (1992). How To Teach Reading. Laguna Beach, CA: Laguna Beach Educational Books.

Hafer, J. (1986). Signing For Reading Success. Washington, DC: Clerc Books, Gallaudet University Press.

Vernon, M. (1983). A New Approach to Reading. Claremont Reading Conference Yearbook, 170-181.


Laura Felzer, February 2010
laurafelzer@gmail.com